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Living Here

Dingwall High Street

Dingwall, with a population of around 5½ thousand, lies where the River Peffery meets the Cromarty Firth, on what is Britain’s most northernly and shortest canal. Dominating the skyline behind the town is Ben Wyvis, a mountain nature reserve.

Dingwall RailwayA gateway to the northern Highlands, Dingwall is well linked to roads heading north, south and west. There is free parking throughout the town, with electric vehicle charging available.

On National Cycle Route 1, Dingwall is also linked by bike to Europe and Scandinavia as part of the epic North Sea Cycle Route (Euro Velo 12). There are also much shorter cycle and foot paths to nearby villages for commuter or leisure purposes.

The train town’s station is on both the stunning Kyle and Far North Lines.

A wide range of local residential and holiday accommodation offers many options for staying in town, or nearby in rural Ross-shire.

The primary school includes a Gaelic medium unit, and there is also a special needs school, an Academy that serves the town, surrounding villages and rural areas with a modern community library, as well as a University of the Highlands & Islands campus.

The town centre, industrial and business parks offer locals and visitors alike a great range of products and services, particularly from independent businesses.

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Dingwall Auction Mart

Dingwall auction market specialises in livestock; farmers and crofters come from across the Highlands and Islands and beyond to buy and sell throughout the year.

Ross County Football Club play in the Scottish Premier League, making their Victoria Park ground home to the most northernly full-time squad in Britain and Ireland.

The community has access to public playing fields, parks and a leisure centre with indoor gym, games halls and swimming pool.

Residents are also served by a medical centre and Ross Memorial hospital.